International Health Insurance

The Policies

one size doesn't fit all

When it comes to health insurance what’s right for you isn’t right for someone else. The differences between costs and cover options can vary significantly from one set of circumstances  to another. 

Factors such as age, location and benefits package can dictate which provider  would suite us best.

For example you may be looking to include dental benefits on your policy. With one provider this could be included along with maternity cover whilst with another it could be it’s own module the cost of each policy would be very different.

For this very reason we look to have access to as broader range of health insurance providers as possible. When it comes to health insurance we believe that the more choice the better!

details

All of the policies that we use are annual renewable single purpose policies. By single purpose we mean that they are designed to pay for health care provisions and that it, no life insurance or critical illness included.

In general there is a commitment to provide continuous coverage irrespective of your claims history whilst a policy holder with that provider. This is conditional to premiums being maintained and could also be subject to age limits though this is not always the case.

Policies provide global coverage though there are usually conditions or restrictions relating to the provision of benefits in North America. Some high cost locations may also be subject to certain conditions on some policies though again this is not always the case.

Policies are portable though higher premiums may apply in your new country of residence. Though depending on where you are heading they could also be lower.

All our providers are highly reputable specialists in providing international health insurance for expatriates and overseas residents.

health care wherever you are!

who it's for

If you’re expat or living and working overseas and you don’t have access to a company or state provided  health care. If your company provides you with a plan yet there are some significant limitations to the extent of your cover international health insurance is for you. 

If you’re about to retire in a new country and you don’t have access to state health care where you’re going. You should be seriously considering a n international health insurance policy.

You could be a company or organisation with employees in more than one country or they could be spread across the globe. In either case an international health insurance policy would save you money not only through economies of scale.

It would also help ensure that your employees and their families had access to the best health care and provide a single point of contact for all of your overseas employees.

No one complains about the cost of health insurance when they're lying in a hospital bed

What you should know

Always underwritten!

There are two ways to set up a health insurance policy, underwritten and moratorium.

Underwritten policies spell out any areas that have been excluded or have conditional coverage. This means that after we’ve answered all of the insurers questions they must tell us about any issues, before we take the cover.

Policies that are set up on a moratorium basis ask all the same questions and reuire the same level of dicsclosure. They just start and only when we come to make a claim will any issues be highlighted. This usually comes in the form of a claim being declined.

Policies that are set up on a moratorium basis are usually quick and easy to set up, though they can leave you disappointed.

Whilst an underwritten policy can take longer to set up and there is a chance that there may be exclusions. At least you know and you’re able to make other arrangements.

Rather than finding out when it’s too late.

only pay for what you need

Today many policies take a modular form allowing you to customise the policy to suite your particular circumstances. Sometimes however this isn’t the case and the policy will have clearly defined plans and you pick one of them.

The issue that can arise with this type of plan is that you may end up paying for benefits that you are simply never going to use.

We once knew of a guy who was paying for maternity benefits for maternity benefits for himself, his two sons and his wife. Ironically they weren’t planning on having anymore children .

The reason for it was that they wanted access to a certain level of cover. This was the only way to accomplish this with this particular provider.

Even with modular policies the same situation can arise though it wouldn’t be as severe as the previous example. This happens when the scope of a module is too broad and could include things you don’t need.

you could get stuck

We often meet people, especially ones who are retiring abroad, who look for the cheapest option for their health care provision.

This may involve joining a hospital scheme run by a medical facility or possibly taking out a local health care plan. Whilst these may offer a cheap solution it isn’t a perfect one.

The issue with a hospital scheme you are prepaying healthcare costs. If you use up all of the capital that you’ve accumulated you will have to pay more to keep your treatment going.

If you take a local policy then you can find that there age limits after which your cover will end. This can leave you high and dry especially if you developed a pre-existing condition.

Finally what if you need health care somewhere else? If you can’t get the treatment you need in the country where you live, what do you do if you’ve used a hospital scheme or local policy?

This may seem a little far fetched, though it is more common than you think. Many countries have amazing medical facilities and yet lack specialist nursing staff that are essential to recovery.

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